HILARY RHODA BRINGS THE FALL COLLECTIONS TO NEW YORK FOR L’OFFICIEL PARIS

Categories:Fashion

Hilary Rhoda on L'Officiel Paris July-August 2016 CoverHilary Rhoda on L’Officiel Paris July-August 2016 Cover

Hilary Rhoda raises a glass on the August 2016 cover of L’Officiel Paris. Photographed by Seth Sabal-Bruce, the brunette stunner wears a Michael Kors Collection ensemble. Hilary wears a fur jacket and printed dress in the image. StylistVanessa Bellugeon selects looks from the fall 2016 collections of Loewe, Givenchy, Miu Miu, Louis Vuitton and more.

Hilary Rhoda poses in New York wearing the fall 2016 collectionsHilary Rhoda poses in New York wearing the fall 2016 collectionsHilary Rhoda wears Louis Vuitton sweater, embroidered dress and metallic bootsHilary Rhoda wears Louis Vuitton sweater, embroidered dress and metallic bootsHilary Rhoda gets her closeup in Louis Vuitton sweaterHilary Rhoda gets her closeup in Louis Vuitton sweaterHilary Rhoda poses in fur coat, printed maxi dress and platform shoes from Marc JacobsHilary Rhoda poses in fur coat, printed maxi dress and platform shoes from Marc JacobsWalking the city streets, Hilary Rhoda wears cropped Givenchy fur coat and skirtWalking the city streets, Hilary Rhoda wears cropped Givenchy fur coat and skirtHilary Rhoda enjoys a drink in Michael Kors Collection fur coat and tweed and silk dressHilary Rhoda enjoys a drink in Michael Kors Collection fur coat and tweed and silk dressPhotographed in black and white, Hilary Rhoda wears coat, sweater, pants and scarf from Bottega VenetaPhotographed in black and white, Hilary Rhoda wears coat, sweater, pants and scarf from Bottega VenetaHilary Rhoda stands out in a vibrant blue ensemble from Michael Kors CollectionHilary Rhoda stands out in a vibrant blue ensemble from Michael Kors CollectionHilary Rhoda wears pastel colored cardigan, denim shirt and skirt from Miu MiuHilary Rhoda wears pastel colored cardigan, denim shirt and skirt from Miu Miu

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FROM SUNLIGHT TO SUNLESS TANNERS: THE HISTORY OF OUR OBSESSION WITH GETTING TAN

Categories:Fashion

Photo: Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Welcome to Fashion History Lesson, in which we dive deep into the origin and evolution of the fashion industry's most influential and omnipresent businesses, icons, trends and more. 

Along with a less encumbered way of female dressing and tweed suits, the practice of tanning can be attributed to one Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel. The widely accepted tale goes something like this: Chanel was photographed in the French Riviera sporting a suntan in 1923, and voila! Bronzed skin became the desired look from then on. But can one woman really be responsible for how billions of people continue to alter their complexions each year?

Of course, the color of "tanned skin" is completely relative, and it's certainly not a universally accepted beauty ideal. While many light-skinned people living in Europe, North America and parts of South America may strive for a deep golden glow, some people in other parts of the world including Asia, India and the Middle East desire paler or pinker skin tones, sometimes using products to lighten their natural hue. There are also plenty of people who are happy to embrace their natural skin pigmentation, regardless of what's deemed attractive in their respective culture.

Though it's not universally desired, it's impossible to deny that tanning has become a huge part of Western ideas of beauty — and sunless tanning a hugely profitable industry. But before you head out for your next tanning session, consider the historical, social and psychological factors that may have influenced your decision to reach for the sunscreen, or not.

WHEN TANNING WAS TABOO

Photo: New York Public Library

Throughout history, paler skin was linked to higher social status, signifying that a person didn't have to endure the effects of the sun's rays from labor or outdoor living. Until the early 1900s, it was standard practice for wealthy European and American women to shield themselves with parasols, hats and gloves.

In 1903, a physician named Niels Finsen was awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine for his invention of "light therapy," which utilized sunlight to combat diseases such as rickets and tuberculosis. Soon, more people were willing to subject their skin to the sun's rays for health purposes, although visibly tanned skin was still in opposition to the beauty standards promoted by Western media into the early 1920s. When covers and creams were not enough to avoid the adverse effects of sunlight, women turned to products like Elizabeth Arden’s Après L'Été, a skin bleacher intended to "banish tan, freckles, and other summer blemishes," as they were often referred to at the time. 

THE RISE OF TANNING CULTURE

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The change in attitude towards sunbathing is closely related to a sartorial shift towards shorter hemlines and less restrictive corsets, as well as the embrace of pleasurable activities such as smoking, drinking and dancing. Like the rebellious nature of flappers, suntans were another way for people to flaunt newfound freedoms after shedding the conservative ways of the Victorian era.

It's said that French beachside resorts first started to remain open throughout the summer (typically their off-season) in 1923, which led to the advent of sunbathing as a pastime for the rich and stylish. Chanel is one of many who began flaunting sun-kissed skin around this time. [4]

TANNING AS AN INDUSTRY

In 1929, Vogue declared that the "sunburn movement" had led to the rise of a whole new industry, including swimsuits, cosmetics and clothing made entirely for the purpose of acquiring or showing off one's hard-earned honey hue. [3]

Fashion designer Jean Patou introduced Huile de Chaldée, the first tanning oil, in 1928. This was followed by the first UV-filtering tanning oil, L'Oréal's Ambre Solaire, in 1935. [5] Coppertone sunblock was invented in the 1940s, but the product truly took off in 1956 thanks to the popularity of the bun-baring Coppertone Girl ad campaign. People were certainly aware of the benefits of UV-blocking products, but that didn't stop millions of people from slathering on baby oil or olive oil to attract maximum rays.

Obtaining an all-over tan was made easier after the bikini was introduced in July of 1946 (happy 70th anniversary!). A deep cinnamon hue became even more desirable when Ursula Andress sported a tan-enhancing white bikini in the 1962 Bond film "Dr. No." Barbie received her "Malibu" makeover in 1971, complete with bleach-blond hair and a significantly darker skin tone, introducing younger girls to the allure of a tan. The first modern indoor tanning bed was introduced in the U.S. in 1978. While paler skin had once been the mark of privilege, tanned skin now signified that you had the time and money to leisurely darken your complexion.

THE FAUX GLOW

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The first sunless tanning products were essentially all-over makeup, such as Glory of the Sun, which promised to give the consumer a perfect tan "out of the box" in 1929. [2] In the 1950s, a medical researcher named Eva Wittgenstein noticed that a medicine she had been testing stained patients' skin, but not their clothes. She discovered that one of the ingredients, dihydroxyacetone (DHA), could safely brown the outer layers of the epidermis. That compound would be used in most sunless tanning products, including Man-Tan, Sudden Tan and Coppertone's Quick Tan (aka QT). Since their inception, manufacturers have continuously tried to reformulate their sunless tanning products to create more natural-looking colors, as well as limiting the dreaded splotches and unpleasant odors.

Then came spray tans. Mystic Tan, the first mainstream version, was introduced in 1998 and provided a glow simply by standing in an automated machine that sprayed users from all angles. This method improved in 2003, when Jimmy Coco created the world's first mobile spray tanning kit, ushering in the era of celebrity spray tans that continue to be seen on red carpets today.

A GUILTY PLEASURE

Photo: Rick Diamond/Getty Images

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, 90 percent of all skin cancers are associated with exposure to the sun's UV radiation, which is also linked to up to 90 percent of aging indicators, such as wrinkles and brown spots. And the crazy thing is, we've known this for decades. Almost as soon as the media first mentioned that tanning was in style, it was warning readers of the permanent skin damage that could result.

On a less serious note, there are also aesthetic dangers to tanning. People are quick to ridicule celebrities who overdo it, perhaps best represented by the Oompa Loompa complexions of the cast of "The Jersey Shore" or the infamous Tan Mom. The leathery-skin epidemic gave birth to the term "Tanorexic" to describe people who are obsessed with tanning to a level that is deemed repulsive by others. [See also: Donald Trump.]

THE TANNING PARADOX

Photo: OJO Images

Why do so many people continue to damage their skin intentionally when they know how dangerous sun exposure is? As numerous research studies have found, people often unconsciously respond to warnings about the danger of a practice by seeking comfort in the behavior that has the potential to harm them. Sounds crazy, but if you've ever smoked a cigarette or had a night of heavy binge drinking, you probably know how easy it is to indulge in something that could have detrimental affects on your health, especially if it's something that is deemed socially acceptable (and desirable/fun).

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Check Out Chloé’s Totally Lovely Fall 2016 Accessories Lookbook

Categories:Other Brands

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SELENA GOMEZ WORKS IT IN LOUIS VUITTON FOR VOGUE BRAZIL

Categories:Louis Vuitton

Selena Gomez on Vogue Brazil June 2016 Cover

Selena Gomez on Vogue Brazil June 2016 Cover

Selena Gomez lands not just one but two covers for the June 2016 issue of Vogue Brazil. Photographed by Bruce Weber, the singer and actress poses alongside Louis Vuitton artistic director Nicolas Ghesquière. In the feature, Selena wears looks from Louis Vuitton’s fall collection. From a graphic print decorated top to a flowy dress, the ‘Revival’ singer shines in each image.

Nicolas Ghesquière and Selena Gomez on Vogue Brazil June 2016 Cover

Nicolas Ghesquière and Selena Gomez on Vogue Brazil June 2016 CoverLouis Vuitton artistic director Nicolas Ghesquière and Selena Gomez pose for a photoshoot

Louis Vuitton artistic director Nicolas Ghesquière and Selena Gomez pose for a photoshootSelena Gomez gets her closeup in a Louis Vuitton top

Selena Gomez gets her closeup in a Louis Vuitton pieceSelena Gomez wears Louis Vuitton bodysuit for the fashion shoot

Selena Gomez wears Louis Vuitton bodysuit for the fashion shoot

Tags: Louis Vuitton

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KYLIE JENNER'S MAKEUP LINE IS LAUNCHING ITS FIRST EYE PRODUCT

Categories:Fashion

Kylie Jenner with her signature brown smoky eye at the 2016 Met Gala. Photo: Getty ImagesKylie Jenner with her signature brown smoky eye at the 2016 Met Gala. 

Kylie Jenner's first eye product is here: the Kyshadow (yes, KYSHADOW) palette, a set of nine powder eye shadows in neutral and brown tones. Jenner, whose Lip Kits have been overwhelmingly successful (and also a tad controversial) first teased the launch on Sunday, posting a cryptic image to Instagram, and telling fans to check out her app and personal website for more information on Monday:

The Kylie Cosmetics Instagram account also posted a tiny peek of the palette (and its slightly creepy packaging—are those supposed to be muddy brown tears?) on Monday afternoon:

But on Jenner's official website, thekyliejenner.com, she offers a close-up glimpse at the goods via video. "I really want to tell people I've been using this every single day," says Jenner, whose signature beauty look (in addition to her often-discussed full lips) typically includes a brown smoky eye. The first palette the company will be launching is The Bronze Palette:

A closeup of the palette, as shown in the video.A closeup of the palette, as shown in the video.

"It was so important for me to release this one first," she says in the video, which also includes a smoky eye tutorial with makeup artist Ariel Tejada. "All of the makeup artists that work with me know that I'm very specific about the colors of brown that go on my eyes," says Jenner in the video. "I really feel like I've perfected it in this palette." She also describes the formula as long-wearing and effortlessly blendable.

Given that Jenner says this one is the "first launch," it's safe to assume that some additional Kyshadow palettes are forthcoming. But for now, we'll be over here, rolling our eyes at the name of it (and, fine, also trying like hell to get our hands on one).

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CHANEL FALL WINTER 2016 CLASSIC AND BOY BAG COLLECTION ACT 1

Categories:Other Brands

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-13

Small Boy Chanel Shearling Sheepskin Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 4.7’ x 7.9’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $3500 USD, €3420 euro, £2900 GBP, $28700 HKD

It’s time to talk about the ‘classics’ right? Oh and don’t forget about the boy oh boy bags. So what’s on the menu this season Chanel?

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-45

Chanel Velvet Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $3700 USD, €3060 euro, £2600 GBP, $4880 SGD, $25700 HKD

We have some good news and bad news? Which one first? The good or the bad? The good news is that Chanel is reintroducing the Classic Flap Bag in velvet. It’s not a new type of material though, but if you’re looking for a cheaper version of this iconic bag, then this is your time. The leather version is retailing for $4900 USD while the velvet version is selling for $3700 USD. The bad news is that velvet is harder to maintain than leather, and once its damaged, it could not be repaired. However, velvet bags give you a different, a more luxurious and soft experience.

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-8

Small Boy Chanel Braided Flap Bag
Style code: A67085
Size: 4.7’ x 7.9’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $4500 USD, €4150 euro, £3520 GBP, $34800 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-9

Medium Boy Chanel Braided Flap Bag (old medium)
Style code: A67086
Size: 5.7’ x 9.8’ x 3.1’ inches
Price: $4900 USD, €4650 euro, £3950 GBP, $39000 HKD

There is actually more good news than bad news. Here’s another fresh Boy Bag crafted from calfskin and braid – a design never-seen-before. Instead of quilting, the high fashion brand crafted the center with braid (which is perfect for the cold winter). This boy has a bolder look, more like urban-chic look for the tough lady. The center features the new Boy Clasp with dots around the CC.

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Small Chanel Flower Crystal Quilted Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A69900
Size: 4.9’ x 7.9’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: Unknown
Medium Chanel Flower Crystal Quilted Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: Unknown

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Chanel Medium Tweed Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $3600 USD, €3450 euro, £2930 GBP, $28900 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-44

Chanel Medium Tweed Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $3600 USD, €3450 euro, £2930 GBP, $28900 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-46

Chanel Medium Tweed Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $3600 USD, €3450 euro, £2930 GBP, $28900 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-10

Medium Boy Chanel Python Flower Crystal Chevron Flap Bag (old medium)
Style code: A67086
Size: 5.7’ x 9.8 x 3.1’ inches
Price: Unknown

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-11

Medium Boy Chanel Python Flower Crystal Chevron Flap Bag (old medium)
Style code: A67086
Size: 5.7’ x 9.8 x 3.1’ inches
Price: Unknown

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-12

Medium Boy Chanel Python Flower Crystal Chevron Flap Bag (old medium)
Style code: A67086
Size: 5.7’ x 9.8 x 3.1’ inches
Price: Unknown

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-47

Chanel Medium Alligator Classic Flap Bag
Style code: A01112
Size: 6.3’ x 10.2’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: Unknown

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Chanel Shearling Sheepskin Coco Handle Bag
Style code: A92991
Size: 7.3’ x 11.4’ x 4.7’ inches
Price: $3700 USD, €3590 euro, £3050 GBP, $30100 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-26

Chanel Large Shearling Sheepskin Coco Handle Bag
Style code: A92992
Size: 8.7’ x 13’ x 4.7’ inches
Price: $3900 USD, €3790 euro, £3220 GBP, $31800 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-29

Chanel Large Python Coco Handle Bag
Style code: A92992
Size: 8.7’ x 13’ x 4.7’ inches
Price: $6200 USD, €5940 euro, £5040 GBP, $49800 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-7

Chanel Shearling Sheepskin Coco Handle Bowling Bag
Style code: A93523
Size: 7.1’ x 11.4 x 5.9’ inches
Price: $3500 USD, €3600 euro, £3060 GBP, $30200 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-5

Chanel Coco Handle Bowling Bag in Calfskin
Style code: A93524
Size: 11.8’ x 13.4 x 5.9’ inches
Price: $3200 USD, €2990 euro, £2540 GBP, $25100 HKD

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Chanel Mini Quilted Calfskin Flap Bag
Style code: A98549
Size: 7.3’ x 11’ x 4.7’ inches
Price: $3300 USD, €3200 euro, £2720 GBP, $26800 HKD
Chanel Quilted Calfskin Tote Bag
Style code: A98551
Size: 11’ x 14.2’ x 5.5’ inches
Price: $4300 USD, €4150 euro, £3520 GBP, $34800 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-35

Chanel Small Quilted Flap Bag
Style code: A91365
Size: 6.3’ x 9.8’ x 3.1’ inches
Price: $4400 USD, €3390 euro, £2880 GBP, $28400 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-34

Chanel Quilted Flap Bag
Style code: A91366
Size: 7.3’ x 11.8’ x 3.1’ inches
Price: $4900 USD, €3740 euro, £3170 GBP, $31400 HKD

Chanel-Fall-Winter-2016-Pre-Fall-Collection-14

Chanel Diamond CC Camera Case
Style code: A93015
Size: 6.3’ x 10.6’ x 2.8’ inches
Price: $2900 USD, €2400 euro, £2040 GBP, $20100 HKD

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Chanel Large Quilted Shopping Tote
Style code: A93525
Size: 14.2’ x 15’ x 6.3’ inches
Price: $4300 USD, €3450 euro, £2930 GBP, $28900 HKD

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Chanel Large Classic Tote Bag
Style code: A91046
Size: 11’ x 14.2’ x 4.3’ inches
Price: $4600 USD, €3750 euro, £3180 GBP, $31500 HKD

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